Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #876853 (stock #58-78)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century Chinese box made for storing small teacups, this piece is an example of an everyday utilitarian object with design and workmanship that stands the test of time. The box is constructed of shaped wood staves fitted together in barrel fashion and secured top and bottom with brass bands. The lid is in two parts, with the back half affixed and the front half removable so that the stacked cups were secure but easily taken out of the container. The box is lacquered in dark red and t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1244658 (stock #39-32)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
From late 19th century Burma, this parabaik, or book, is made of thick cardboard-like paper folded accordion-style with front and back covers of gilded relief lacquer. The paper was made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree that was boiled for a day until soft, then pounded and spread on fabric that was stretched across a frame. The frame was repeatedly dipped in water and drained, then dried in the sun, spread with glue and chalk powder, and finally, polished with seeds. The thick paper ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1089599 (stock #11-21)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A Qing Dynasty lidded wooden box designed to serve pancakes combines handsome form with evidence of long use to evoke hundreds of banquets in late 18th/early 19th century China. The top of the notched lid is centered with a green and gold painting of chrysanthemums, symbol of conviviality. Faded calligraphy can still be seen on the underside of the lid. The bottom surface of the container also has very faint remains of calligraphy. Two deeply worn areas along the top surface of the tall hand-h...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1980 item #818403 (stock #12-28)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
A small metal balance scale is enclosed within this wood container carved in the shape of the Burmese crane, known as a “karaweik,” that holds a fish in its bill. Although commonly called “opium” scales, such rudimentary instruments, and the so-called “opium” weights used with them, were basic merchant tools used in daily bazaars to measure just about anything that fit into the small trays. Mythical animals and birds were favorite design elements for items associated with the scales....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1910 item #1240857 (stock #51-27)
Silk Road Gallery
$295.00
This late Qing Dynasty carved wood home altar, referred to as a “Buddha House,” is from Shandong Province in East China. It includes a wood cover that was slipped down over the altar, where a small Buddha was displayed. The cover was removed for family devotions. Gilded pierced carving framing the altar, while it appears to be scrolling or foliage, on close inspection is two stylized dragons that form the sides of the frame. The altar is just deep enough to display a figure up to 9 ¼” ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1837 VR item #894121 (stock #07-61)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
A merchant’s money box, or zeni-bako, from Japan’s Edo Period carries an inscription that reads, “Purchased one lucky day in November in the 12th year of Bunsei,” which was 1829. The small copper coins in use at that time were called “zeni” and led to the development of simple, strong boxes for merchants to store coins during the business day. This box is made of thick keyaki wood and fitted with an iron lock and hasp. The top is constructed in two sections with a hole in the middle ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth. A pliable mixture ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles. The type and amount of carving and other decoration also varied but almost w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #898500 (stock #63-30)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century lacquer betel box from Burma is incised in an intricate pattern called “yok-thei,” with tiny dancers swirling through vegetal scrolling. The small design, primarily red and green, is punctuated with black and green circles that look like launching pads for the flying stylized dancers. (For a betel box with a similar yok-thei pattern, see color plate # 41 in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994.) This is one of the more...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #800706 (stock #58-47)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
Among the many varieties of red lacquered containers used during China's Qing and early Republic years, none has a more striking form than the humble lunch pail. An elegantly designed everyday item, it is constructed of shaped wood staves, a tall bent willow handle and a notched lid that snaps securely in place around the handle. Pails in this design also are referred to as berry pails. The recessed bottom on this one is decorated with two drawings of flowers, perhaps done by the maker of the pa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1900 item #898946 (stock #60-18)
Silk Road Gallery
$345.00
A late Qing portable elm wood vanity box has two drawers for cosmetics behind relief carved and gilded doors, a folding mirror secured with a hasp and two metal side handles, all suggesting it was used for travel or at least easily carried from one area of the living quarters to another. Birds and flowers are carved on the doors, and the mirror is encircled with a carved scalloped frame of gilt-touched flowers. This handsome piece originated in Fujian Province and is in excellent condition. Al...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #291633 (stock #60-22)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
Elegant wood boxes with drawers and compartments were regarded by Chinese scholars as essential for the storage of the small personal items they valued. Their carved signature seals and ink sticks often were stored in these boxes, which usually were kept on a desk in the scholar's study but were small enough to be moved easily into the courtyard when he preferred to work outside. This late 19th century box has three drawers and a compartment with two doors made of nicely beaded panels. Door pane...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina. (For a similar offering bowl see "Burmese Crafts Past and Present" by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994, color plate 45.) The ta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #680180 (stock #60-90)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
Made of beautifully grained willow wood, this early 20th century Chinese water carrier is just the right size and shape to hold magazines or newspapers. The tall handle is centered with a well done carving of a tree branch and two pomegranates, a traditional symbol of fertility in old China. The oval-shaped body of the vessel is made of curved willow wood staves fitted tightly together and held with two brass bands. Although the piece seems too handsome for its intended use as a water pail, the ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising. Lines were incised through the top coats of black lacquer to reveal the persimmon-colored lacquer underne...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #921672 (stock #58-63)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A large basket from China’s late Qing Dynasty has a sturdy weave of reeds bordered by two wide bands of bent willow, originally painted with bright flowers that now are faded. An example of the provincial Chinese skill and artistry devoted to utilitarian objects, the basket is designed to form two serving bowls when fully opened. Dumplings were stored and served in this container, which is from the western region of Shaanxi, where excellent dumplings are a source of provincial pride. A metal r...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1233407 (stock #12-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
From China’s Shaanxi Province, known for its many types of marvelous dumplings, this late Qing woven reed basket opens clamshell fashion to form two large serving bowls. Wide bent willow bands painted with flowers and secured to the basketry with metal studs encircle the top and bottom sections. A metal hasp in the front is used to keep the top and bottom closed, and a metal ring in the back is used to keep the two sections attached when they are used as bowls. This piece shows appropriate ...