Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1239618 (stock #63-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
This cinnabar-colored four-piece lacquer box from late 19th century Burma has intricate designs incised in fine black lines on its hatbox-style lid, high-sided container and two trays. The tortoise shell design is interspersed with small circles, and the lid top is centered with a gold-accented drawing of a character in native dress...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #834732 (stock #10-62)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A fine, tight weave of thin reeds gives texture to the cinnabar and black lacquer finish of this mid-19th century Burmese bowl. The textural quality is heightened by the wearing of top layers of cinnabar lacquer revealing black lacquer underneath for a handsome negoro effect. Resting on four low feet, the bowl, or “kwet,” flares out to a wide point about three-quarters up its height, and then gently angles in toward its crisp upper edge...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #718754 (stock #40-85)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,100.00
A 600-year-old bronze Buddha from the old Shan capital of Pinya in northern Burma sits in padmasana position with right hand in bhumisparsa, or earth touching, mudra. The Shan, who migrated down into north Burma from Yunnan, China, established their first capital at Pinya in 1298 during Burma's early Ava Period (1287-1752). In 1364, a Shan capital was established in Ava, where the Shan stayed until 1555...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #265851 (stock #10-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$300.00
One of the most exotic sculptural forms in Southeast Asia, the naga, a sea dragon with a high curving spire, is seen at temple entrances an on roofs. This 19th century carved teak wood naga was once a finial on a temple roof in Thailand. The mythical serpent is said to have protected the Buddha from lightning as he sat meditating under a bodhi tree and so is used to guard against evil spirits, particularly natural disasters...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1910 item #981876 (stock #10-47)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
A classic Burmese bronze Buddha from the late 19th/early 20th century, with the simple, unadorned lines of the Ava Period, is softened with roundness in the face and body. The stepped throne, rather than the traditional diamond shape, also is rounded, adding to the settled, secure look of the figure. Legacies of the traditional Ava style also are seen in the well defined brow over lowered eyes, the slight smile, and a band separating hair and forehead...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #678034 (stock #63-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Seated in lotus position, this early 20th century bronze Burmese Buddha has classic Ava features. The right hand is in bhumisparsa mudra (earth touching, centering), the robe is quite simple, the face triangular with small upturned mouth and the head is topped with an onion-shaped finial--all Ava attributes. Unlike the more ornate double lotus throne seen on many Ava figures, however, this Buddha of later vintage sits on a plain waisted throne...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #820399 (stock #06-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
Pair
Teak hangers for decorative textiles or drapes are carved with figures of Dewi Sri, Hindu goddess of agrarian fertility, a revered icon on the Indonesian island of Java. The painted faces are in the style of the old Majapahit Empire that flourished in East Java during the 13th to 15th centuries. These hangers are from the early 19th century...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #978464 (stock #31-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This bronze leogryph figure with human face is from early 20th century Burma and is a variation of the Buddhist temple guardian called manok-thi-ha or manushi, names derived from the Sanskrit words for man (manu) and lion (simha). Burmese manok-thi-ha often have double rear quarters (two bums—see our catalog item 63-37). This one is single-bummed and outfitted with heavy necklace, chest ornament and lots of swirls...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #279346 (stock #08-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$675.00
Elements of folk art blended with features of a classical Burmese Buddha give great charm to this unusual 18th century lacquered and gilded wood figure. The face is finely carved and serene, with well defined brows, downcast eyes and expressive lips. The ears, angled nearly straight out with jaunty flying lobes, and the exaggerated, very high finial are areas where the carver departed tradition in expression, perhaps, of his own personal image of the Buddha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #792803 (stock #13-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,150.00
A crowned bronze Buddha in the Arakan style sits in meditation on a double lotus throne that rests atop a large figural pedestal. This early 20th century lost wax casting of a royal Buddha follows a form introduced in the 14th century Arakan Kingdom that was located in what is now Rakhine in Western Burma...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #936671 (stock #41-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,800.00
A dolomite plaque carved with the eight great scenes in the life of Buddha dates to the early 16th century during Burma’s Ava Period (1364 -1752 A.D). Plaques from as early as 700 A.D. depicting these eight events have been unearthed in Burma, and during the Pagan Period (1084-1287 A.D.) carved tablets representing the eight episodes became prevalent. This dolomite (limestone) piece has Pagan attributes such as the definition of the robe on the central Buddha but signals of its later Ava orig...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #854196 (stock #10-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
This large lacquered early 20th century bowl from the Shan people, who live primarily in eastern parts of Burma and across the border in western and northern areas of Thailand, is called a “kwet” and was used to serve huge quantities of rice. It is made of split bamboo basketry supported by six sturdy ribs that curve down to end in six low feet. The basic bamboo construction is coated inside and out with layers of black lacquer overlaid with layers of red lacquer. The basketry shows through ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #922753 (stock #63-29)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Delicately incised yun designs on a three-piece lacquer betel box from the Burmese city of Pagan depict scenes of five elegantly dressed courtiers, each portrayed within a distinctive and elaborate portal. The name of the artisan, Ko Sein Maung, is incised in one ribbon-like cartouche, and his locale, Pagan Dikesu, in another. The wish, chantha basage (may you be rich), appears in a third cartouche. The container has three parts—a deep lid, a high base and a fitted tray. It is designed to reta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long. Three lines of script etched into the lacquer around the base of...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising. Lines were incised through the top coats of black lacquer to reveal the persimmon-colored lacquer underne...