Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1136045 (stock #63-11)
Silk Road Gallery
$370.00
The cinnabar lacquer covering this late 19th/early 20th century Burmese “kwet,” or serving bowl, is satin smooth and cool to the touch. Years of daily use have enhanced both the look and feel of this large bowl, with black lacquer showing through the red in areas of wear. Six black ribs curve down to the feet, and the top is curved and rolled inward, giving the vessel beautiful balance. The old Burmese process of producing such lacquer pieces was labor intensive and time consuming...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #820399 (stock #06-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
Pair
Teak hangers for decorative textiles or drapes are carved with figures of Dewi Sri, Hindu goddess of agrarian fertility, a revered icon on the Indonesian island of Java. The painted faces are in the style of the old Majapahit Empire that flourished in East Java during the 13th to 15th centuries. These hangers are from the early 19th century...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #792803 (stock #13-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,150.00
A crowned bronze Buddha in the Arakan style sits in meditation on a double lotus throne that rests atop a large figural pedestal. This early 20th century lost wax casting of a royal Buddha follows a form introduced in the 14th century Arakan Kingdom that was located in what is now Rakhine in Western Burma. The high opulent crown, side flanges, ear plugs and elaborate chest ornament are Arakan jambhupati features. Origin of the unusual pedestal is not so easily discerned...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #686777 (stock #63-41)
Silk Road Gallery
$795.00
Right hand raised in jnana (teaching) mudra, this Burmese bronze Buddha sits in lotus position on a double lotus throne. The Buddha's thumb and index finger form a circle to signify the Buddhist wheel of law, the dharmachakra. This early 20th century Buddha is Ava in style, with the body tilting slightly forward on a waisted lotus throne that is tall relative to the height of the figure...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #279346 (stock #08-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$675.00
Elements of folk art blended with features of a classical Burmese Buddha give great charm to this unusual 18th century lacquered and gilded wood figure. The face is finely carved and serene, with well defined brows, downcast eyes and expressive lips. The ears, angled nearly straight out with jaunty flying lobes, and the exaggerated, very high finial are areas where the carver departed tradition in expression, perhaps, of his own personal image of the Buddha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #854196 (stock #10-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
This large lacquered early 20th century bowl from the Shan people, who live primarily in eastern parts of Burma and across the border in western and northern areas of Thailand, is called a “kwet” and was used to serve huge quantities of rice. It is made of split bamboo basketry supported by six sturdy ribs that curve down to end in six low feet. The basic bamboo construction is coated inside and out with layers of black lacquer overlaid with layers of red lacquer...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #949034 (stock #57-73)
Silk Road Gallery
$850.00
This cast metal Buddha from Cambodia stands on a low pedestal with right hand raised in abhaya mudra, a gesture of blessing and protection. The facial features—full lips, short nose and heavy-lidded eyes, as well as the rounded head of tight curls with a wide usnisa (top knot) and no finial—are classic Khmer. Decorative detailing on the body-hugging robe is emphasized by the silver tone of the heavy metal alloy...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #903490 (stock #57-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$975.00
A Mon Buddha from 18th century Burma has the distinctive facial features and very high finial that identify Mon images from the Ava period. The waisted throne is edged with geometric decorations typical of Mon images of the era. We purchased this figure about 20 years ago in Burma from a dealer whose collection included mostly 19th century Shan images...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1910 item #786538 (stock #10-40)
Silk Road Gallery
$790.00
This bronze Buddha, with attributes true to Burma's late Ava period of the 1600s, was cast a few hundred years later in the late 19th/early 20th century. It was common practice for Burmese artisans of later periods to copy styles that originated much earlier, sometimes mixing attributes from several periods and regions. In this beautifully cast handsome Buddha, the form follows the Ava look in all respects. The wide forehead, lowered eyes, well-defined nose and small, slightly upturned lips comb...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #757166 (stock #08-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$375.00
A modest little folk Buddha with right hand in earth touching mudra sits on a red and black double lotus throne. Made of lacquered teak wood, the carving is from the Shan minority in Burma. The gilded Buddha has the downcast eyes, prominent brow, small chin and large finial generally seen on Shan figures. It most likely was displayed in a village daimyo, a covered outdoor pavilion with a stepped altar holding a number of Buddha figures of various sizes, a local gathering place for daily devotion...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #978464 (stock #31-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This bronze leogryph figure with human face is from early 20th century Burma and is a variation of the Buddhist temple guardian called manok-thi-ha or manushi, names derived from the Sanskrit words for man (manu) and lion (simha). Burmese manok-thi-ha often have double rear quarters (two bums—see our catalog item 63-37). This one is single-bummed and outfitted with heavy necklace, chest ornament and lots of swirls. The fantastic manok-thi-ha, a creature from Buddhist mythology, is said to roam...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1700 item #164750 (stock #40-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$950.00
Still bearing very slight traces of gold leaf, this small 15th century bronze head of Buddha is from Burma's Ava Period (1287-1752). It most likely was commissioned and donated by a family as an act of merit, and was buried under a stupa for centuries. The Burmese of the time were skilled metalworkers. When a bronze Buddha image was cast, even a small one such as this, astrologers were called in to name the most auspicious day and hour for the casting, and monks cleansed the site of evil spirits...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #886035 (stock #11-15)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 20th century Buddha from a Shan village in Burma wears an outer robe that flares wide at either side framing a lavishly adorned robe pulled tightly across the legs in a form fitting look originally associated with Pagan figures. The Buddha has the right hand turned palm out in varada mudra, a gesture of wish fulfillment and charity. Carved of teak wood, it is coated with dark red lacquer touched with gilding. Robe adornments were created with a uniquely Burmese lacquer process involvin...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #291897 (stock #02-34)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
Inscriptions cover the left and back sides of the throne under this 18th century seated Burmese Shan Buddha. Made of lacquered wood coated with gilt, the figure is graceful and well proportioned, with a finely carved face. Long, tilted eyes under high eyebrows that sweep upward toward the hairline are the most arresting features of the peaceful face, which is smoothly capped in dark lacquer and topped with an exceptionally tall finial. Hands and robe details are simple and realistic; the feet, d...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #788418 (stock #64-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An elephant with raised trunk, symbol of hospitality, forms the handle of this carved teakwood Burmese rice scoop. The dark red lacquer, applied over black lacquer in the traditional manner of Burmese artisans, is worn so the black undercoat shows through in areas, giving this early 20th century piece an inviting patina. The elephant trunk, which forms the scoop handle, is especially worn and shows evidence of many years of use. A simple decorative pattern is carved along the top of the scoop, a...