Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Sri Lanka : Pre 1837 VR item #795716 (stock #35-91)
Silk Road Gallery
$150.00
From the old capital of Kandy in the hill country of Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, this primitive bone carving represents a Singhalese king. Carving on the face and upper body of the figure is quite primitive and contrasts with finer detailing in the swirling patterns on the long skirt, which ends in carved, comb-like teeth. The surface of the large, heavy bone is darkened with age except for one area on the right near the hand, which is white and worn smooth. This suggests it was used as an implemen...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #806740 (stock #64-02)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
This most unusual rice ladle from the Shan minority people of Southeast Asia has carvings of a peacock, an elephant, a donkey, a fish and a mystery animal all lined up along its handle. Carving on the double handle, simulating rope, is skillfully done; carving on the animals is more primitive. The bowl is made from a sturdy gourd coated with lacquer. This ladle originated in one of the many small Shan villages concentrated in northeast Burma and was used to scoop rice into the alms bowls of monk...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Central Asian : Pre 1980 item #940023 (stock #23-98)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This two-headed terracotta dragon is a replica of dragons that topped walls surrounding the ancient Central Asian city of Samarkand, Uzbekistan. The Samarkand wall and its dragons, though long gone, seem to occupy a place in the collective memories of the polyglot population of present-day Uzbekistan. This piece was made by a Tajik artisan who lives near Samarkand, and is a small representation of the long, rich and often perplexing history of Central Asia. Neither the artisan nor anyone else w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Paintings : Pre 1960 item #1223013 (stock #10-72)
Silk Road Gallery
$100.00
Originally part of a set of 27 scrolls, this painting is from the Yao (Mein) tribal people living in the Golden Triangle area where Thailand, Burma and Laos meet. The Yao, one of the six so-called hill tribes residing in the Golden Triangle, follow Taoism as it was practiced in China in the 13th and 14th centuries. This painting on mulberry paper was one of several face masks representing ancestral spirits that were part of the complete set of large scrolls. It was worn by a tribal elder during...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1980 item #818403 (stock #12-28)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
A small metal balance scale is enclosed within this wood container carved in the shape of the Burmese crane, known as a “karaweik,” that holds a fish in its bill. Although commonly called “opium” scales, such rudimentary instruments, and the so-called “opium” weights used with them, were basic merchant tools used in daily bazaars to measure just about anything that fit into the small trays. Mythical animals and birds were favorite design elements for items associated with the scales....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #891192 (stock #64-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This late 19th century offering vessel from the Burmese city of Pagan is an exceptionally fine example of the hsun-ok containers used to carry food offerings to Buddhist monasteries and temples. It is made of wood covered with many coats of lacquer, black first and then top layers of rich deep red. As the red lacquer wears away in areas exposing the black, a handsome negoro effect is created. A similar wooden hsun-ok is pictured in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxfo...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #167518 (stock #16-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$160.00
This primitive carved wood mask is from the Batak people who live around mystical Lake Toba in the northern reaches of the island of Sumatra. The small collection of Batak protector masks pictured in this catalogue (see them all under our category "Tribal") shows the fascinating range of facial expressions artisans were able to achieve in these relatively simply carved masks. This particular mask is unusual because the face appears to be smiling; its world class bloodshot eyes, however, are simi...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1837 VR item #839958 (stock #10-81)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An unusually large early to mid-19th century Shan hsun-ok from Burma, this piece has a diameter of 19 inches and stands 32 inches high. Full size offering bowls with the distinctive hsun-ok silhouette generally are about 13 to 15 inches in diameter. This one is a masterpiece of balance with the ten identifying Shan raised rings around the lid echoed with 10 raised rings around base. The carvings on the spire, punctuated by a large ball, complement the substantial circumference of the piece. Its...