Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #891192 (stock #64-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This late 19th century offering vessel from the Burmese city of Pagan is an exceptionally fine example of the hsun-ok containers used to carry food offerings to Buddhist monasteries and temples. It is made of wood covered with many coats of lacquer, black first and then top layers of rich deep red. As the red lacquer wears away in areas exposing the black, a handsome negoro effect is created. A similar wooden hsun-ok is pictured in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxfo...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #806740 (stock #64-02)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
This most unusual rice ladle from the Shan minority people of Southeast Asia has carvings of a peacock, an elephant, a donkey, a fish and a mystery animal all lined up along its handle. Carving on the double handle, simulating rope, is skillfully done; carving on the animals is more primitive. The bowl is made from a sturdy gourd coated with lacquer. This ladle originated in one of the many small Shan villages concentrated in northeast Burma and was used to scoop rice into the alms bowls of monk...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Central Asian : Jewelry : Pre 1900 item #918086 (stock #27-35)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
Two pierced and jeweled diamond-shaped metal plates are Teke Turkoman in design. A similar 19th century pectoral plate is pictured in the periodical, Arts of Asia, May/June 2009, on page 122 in the article “Beyond Orientalism: Works Inspired by Islamic Art,” by Lucien De Guise, curator of the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia. Other similar rhomboid pectoral jewelry is pictured in “The Arts and Crafts of Turkestan,” by Johannes Kalter, Thames and Hudson, 1984, page 126. The two 19th century ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied. Tin trays were replacing these handmade ones a number o...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #896352 (stock #63-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
An offering stand, or “kalat,” used by the Intha people who live in the villages around Inle Lake in one of the Shan states in northeastern Burma, is from the late 19th century. A similar though more recent piece in the British Museum is pictured in “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer,” by Isaacs and Blurton, British Museum Press, p. 163. Kalat stands such as this were used by families in much the same manner as the tall, spired hsun-ok to carry offerings of food ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1940 item #790468 (stock #54-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$360.00
A Japanese silk summer-weight hitoe obi has impressionistic designs of graceful dancers and tori gates in cooling shades of silver on a purple background. This woven silk kimono belt is unlined and constructed of one layer of fabric, unlike the more formal maru and fukuro obi. A cloud pattern in purple and silver on the reverse side of the fabric shows through under the weave on the right side of the material, giving the silver designs an attractive shimmer that varies from tones of pink to blue...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Thai : Pre 1990 item #937270 (stock #01-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$135.00
A charming hand woven and decorated basket of split bamboo made in an Isan village in Northeastern Thailand is smoothed on the exterior with an application of brick red lacquer thickened with ash. Yellow and green flowers and dots on black grounds give the basket folk appeal. The Isan (also Isaan) people, though sometimes called Thai Isan, are a blend of Lao, Mon and and Khmer, and have their own language, which is Lao-like but written in the Thai alphabet. They are primarily agrarian and live i...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre 1900 item #935760 (stock #61-32)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This exotic 19th century sterling silver ceremonial necklace from the opulent past of Rajasthan was once part of the collection of a high ranking Rajput family, most likely worn by a senior member of the clan on festival days. It is 92 percent sterling with a weight of 255 grams. Central to the imagery is a large disc formed by a crouching lion with an unusual extended hinged tongue that wags from side to side as the necklace wearer moves. Spreading to the left and right below the disc are ante...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Central Asian : Textiles : Pre 1920 item #1014401 (stock #14-83)
Silk Road Gallery
$430.00
Flatwoven Kilim bags such as this one were used centuries ago by the nomadic Turkic tribes of Central Asia. The bags were made in various shapes and sizes to hold everything from salt to liquids to household goods. Woven of a combination of camel hair and wool, this bag is from the Uzbek people. The weaving is spectacular—tight enough to hold water—with a clean, intricate pattern inside six horizontal bands. Called “ jabors” or ” juvals,” rectangular bags in this size were tied to ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #945150 (stock #40-09)
Silk Road Gallery
$160.00
This silver and clay pipe is from a Lawa tribal group living in northern Thailand. (For Lawa pipes similar to this one, see “Peoples of the Golden Triangle,” by Paul and Elaine Lewis, Thames and Hudson, 1998, p. 66.) The Lawa, also called Lua or Wa/Lawa, are a lowland people, one of the smaller tribal groups among the hill tribes of Thailand, Burma and Laos. The black clay bowl on this pipe is in pristine condition, suggesting it replaced earlier bowls that were affixed to the old curved sil...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Middle Eastern : Pre 1900 item #984270 (stock #27-64)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Folk jewelry from a remote mountain village in the Caucasus region of Georgia has five agate stones and hanging silver-toned embossed disks. Most likely made by a village artisan, this piece has vitality in its less-than-perfect round and oval settings, the variegated orange hue of the stones and the faint jingle from the hanging disks. The design has a Middle Eastern feel, similar to jewelry made in the country of Dagestan, which borders Georgia on the northeast, and also to pieces from Central...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #854196 (stock #10-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
This large lacquered early 20th century bowl from the Shan people, who live primarily in eastern parts of Burma and across the border in western and northern areas of Thailand, is called a “kwet” and was used to serve huge quantities of rice. It is made of split bamboo basketry supported by six sturdy ribs that curve down to end in six low feet. The basic bamboo construction is coated inside and out with layers of black lacquer overlaid with layers of red lacquer. The basketry shows through ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre 1900 item #417570 (stock #61-30)
Silk Road Gallery
$980.00
A beautifully crafted piece of jewelry from Rajasthan in North India, this sterling silver necklace has finely embossed images of 44 peacocks and is itself shaped to resemble a fanned peacock tail. From the late 19th century, the necklace is made of 92.5 percent silver and weighs 240 grams. Judging by its weight, regal design and motif of the peacock, national bird of India, this was a ceremonial piece and most likely was worn by a man. Eight vertical plates with peacocks and flowers in graduat...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre 1940 item #708990 (stock #61-22)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A beautifully made sterling silver link bracelet is formed of 28 small crests that sparkle on the wrist. An unusual link system gives this piece exceptional flexibility, and the 27-gram silver weight gives it a substantial yet comfortable look and feel. The bracelet was made by the Jain people of India, who are known for their artistic skills, particularly in creating fine jewelry. They are a small minority in India, accounting for about only .4 percent of the population, and follow an ancient r...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Jewelry : Pre 1900 item #1240251 (stock #11-28)
Silk Road Gallery
$240.00
A 19th century silver charm necklace from China’s late Qing Dynasty has four auspicious symbols hanging on short chains from a crest-shaped pendant of Buddhist iconography. At the center of the crest are crossed rhinoceros horns, symbol of happiness and one of the Chinese eight treasures. At the tip of each horn is a small sauvastika, derived from ancient Sanskrit and meaning “so be it.” (The sauvastika has its crampons directed to the left, unlike the notorious 20th century swastika sy...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1837 VR item #839958 (stock #10-81)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An unusually large early to mid-19th century Shan hsun-ok from Burma, this piece has a diameter of 19 inches and stands 32 inches high. Full size offering bowls with the distinctive hsun-ok silhouette generally are about 13 to 15 inches in diameter. This one is a masterpiece of balance with the ten identifying Shan raised rings around the lid echoed with 10 raised rings around base. The carvings on the spire, punctuated by a large ball, complement the substantial circumference of the piece. Its...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1980 item #818403 (stock #12-28)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
A small metal balance scale is enclosed within this wood container carved in the shape of the Burmese crane, known as a “karaweik,” that holds a fish in its bill. Although commonly called “opium” scales, such rudimentary instruments, and the so-called “opium” weights used with them, were basic merchant tools used in daily bazaars to measure just about anything that fit into the small trays. Mythical animals and birds were favorite design elements for items associated with the scales....
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Pre 2000 item #694009 (stock #25-08)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
Embroidered with a traditional Kirghiz pattern on thick hand-rolled felt, this large bag evokes the nomadic life of the people of Kirghizstan in Central Asia. Bags in this style held household items and were hung on the walls of felt yurts. When it was time to fold the yurt and move on, the bags with the contents simply were slung on the camels' backs--no packing required. This bag was made by women from Kara-Kol, a valley town in the Tien Shan Mountains. They have formed a cooperative to produc...