Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #392459 (stock #55-22)
Silk Road Gallery
$495.00
While traveling in Burma (Myanmar) many years ago, we were enchanted by the particularly sonorous sounds of Burmese bronze gongs. Our resulting small shipment of various sizes of these gongs remained in storage until we had stands made for them in China. The stands are constructed with traditional Chinese tenon joinery of aged, reclaimed elm wood. The bright red fabric-covered striker, hand sewn in Burma, has the proper degree of softness to produce a full sound from this relatively small gong, ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1940 item #1128330 (stock #12-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$670.00
A gilded Mandalay Buddha standing two feet tall strikes a graceful pose, with right hand in the varada mudra of charity and the fulfillment of wishes. Carved of dense Burmese teak wood, this early to mid-20th century figure is coated with a dark red matte lacquer highlighted with a liberal application of gilding. This Buddha’s finely carved face is striking, with especially large elongated eyes and brows. Elaborate draping and folds on the robe are emphasized with gilded scrolling and beading...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1910 item #1222465 (stock #63-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
This teak sculpture, more than three feet tall, represents a supernatural character from ancient Burmese folklore, Zaw-gyi, who is said to possess a fantastic range of powers. Zaw-gyi is immortal, forever youthful, can fly and practices alchemy, to name just a few of his talents. He lives in solitude and strives for spiritual perfection. An important member in the region’s pantheon of superheroes prior to the arrival of Buddhism in Burma, he was solidly integrated into Buddhist...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles. The type and amount of carving and other decoration also varied but almost w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #878968 (stock #60-11)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This Taihu scholar's stone is classified as "linglong," one of the criteria used by connoisseurs to judge the rocks collected by Chinese literati. The term linglong may be translated as "shapely" or as "pierced with many holes." This stone also is in the category of "fantastic rock" (as opposed to "zoomorphic rocks" and "landscape rocks") for the obvious reason that one can see abstract, dream-like representations in its form. Shaped by the water of Tai Hu (Lake Tai) near Suzhou, its dark khaki...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #860292 (stock #31-27)
Silk Road Gallery
On Hold
A pair of pulleys that were used on a hand loom in Burma show the Burmese love for exuberant decorative elements on objects for everyday use. The tall carved peacocks are larger than the pulleys, and may have been just one of a number of such decorations on a woman’s loom. Simple household objects are traditionally well made and attractive in Burma, where no lines are drawn between fine arts and folk or applied arts. The peacock, emblem of the Kon-baung Dynasty (1752-1885), remains a favorite ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1837 VR item #902690 (stock #38-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 18th century inkstone has a gourd-shaped ink pool cut into a deep black stone slab that, along with brushes, ink and paper, represented what was referred to in Chinese literature as “the four precious things of the library.” Among the four objects, inkstones were considered the most important, the soul of the scholar’s library, because they were said to represent “the infinite subtlety of nature.” Although they appear to be relatively humble objects, inkstones were praised, co...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1345209 (stock #64-46)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Eight bronze weights, commonly known as opium weights, are cast in the image of a mythical wild goose. The bird, referred to as "hintha" in Burmese or as "hamsa" in Sanskrit, is regarded as a sacred icon and also is the symbol of Burma's Mon People. Weights in the forms of mythical birds and animals were used in Burma from the 18th century into the 20th century to weigh small household items purchased in the marketplaces. Over the years, they became known as "opium" weights, but according to S...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #1250809 (stock #06-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
pair
These teak hangers are from Solo on the Indonesian island of Java and date to the early 19th century. Painted carvings of Hanuman, the heroic white monkey from the Southeast Asian epic, “The Ramayana,” sit atop long curved tails that form textile hangers. Fabrics can be draped so the Hanuman figures face front or to the sides. The hangers have holes at the top end so they can be either suspended or affixed directly to a wall. (See a similar set of hangers with different carved figures by ...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Contemporary item #760551 (stock #24-06)
Silk Road Gallery
$120.00
A carved vase of hardwood native to Uzbekistan shows the strong relationship in aesthetics between Middle Eastern Persian or Iranian design and that of the Uzbeks of Central Asia. This piece is the product of an Uzbek family woodcarving business run by the family matriarch, herself a second generation woodcarver. Although the business mainly produces large ornately carved furniture for the local market in Uzbekistan, family members take great delight in creating small, carefully carved, time-con...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #886035 (stock #11-15)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 20th century Buddha from a Shan village in Burma wears an outer robe that flares wide at either side framing a lavishly adorned robe pulled tightly across the legs in a form fitting look originally associated with Pagan figures. The Buddha has the right hand turned palm out in varada mudra, a gesture of wish fulfillment and charity. Carved of teak wood, it is coated with dark red lacquer touched with gilding. Robe adornments were created with a uniquely Burmese lacquer process involvin...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1900 item #257200 (stock #03-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
The naga, Southeast Asia's "dragon of the sea," is a favorite protector throughout the region. This one, of weathered teak wood, is from Thailand where naga often are seen in pairs at entrances to temple grounds and positioned at intervals along roof lines. They are there to ward off evil spirits and natural disaster just as the naga is said to have protected the Buddha from lightning as he meditated under a bo tree. This one still has traces of yellow paint, and most likely was studded with bri...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #985475 (stock #55-25)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This hand hammered bronze gong from Burma emits a mid-range mellow tone when struck at the center of its starburst pattern with a padded mallet. Hanging circular gongs of this sort are used in a Burmese orchestra, where an ornate lacquered wood gong circle, called a “kyi waing” surrounds 20 or so gongs of graduated sizes and tones. Gongs of various sizes also are used for Buddhist rites in temples and monasteries throughout Burma. When created for use as musical instruments, these carefully ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #799154 (stock #38-93)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
This early to mid-19th century Chinese pewter teapot is sized to brew two small cups of tea. The outsized handle, made to resemble a Western cup handle, and the long curved spout are said to be a favorite design of that era, probably because it was so functional. Pewter was used for brewing strong teas; ceramics for brewing lighter teas. This pot has a few small dents on one side of the shoulder; otherwise it is in good condition. Dimensions: height 7" (18 cm), width from handle to spout tip 6-1...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #167518 (stock #16-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$160.00
This primitive carved wood mask is from the Batak people who live around mystical Lake Toba in the northern reaches of the island of Sumatra. The small collection of Batak protector masks pictured in this catalogue (see them all under our category "Tribal") shows the fascinating range of facial expressions artisans were able to achieve in these relatively simply carved masks. This particular mask is unusual because the face appears to be smiling; its world class bloodshot eyes, however, are simi...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #699949 (stock #25-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,100.00
This Ava Period (1287-1752) limestone Buddha head was found in Burma in the mid-1990s. It obviously was cut from a stone backslab, indicating an early to mid Ava timeframe since the use of backslabs, prevalent during the earlier Pagan Period, declined during the late Ava years. The Buddha has a wide, squarish face, prominent eyebrows, well modeled lips and smooth cap, all Ava attributes. It is intriguing to speculate whether it was grouped with other figures and where it was displayed, as the ba...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Pre 1960 item #1227248 (stock #11-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
The hands of this vintage teak Burmese Buddha are carved in a variation of the Darmachakra mudra, the gesture that represents teaching and the Buddhist wheel of law. The mudra is most often expressed with thumbs and index fingers of both hands forming separate circles. Here, the thumb and finger of the right hand encircle the middle finger of the left hand. When we found this Buddha in Burma, complex explanations about the precise meaning of this variation were not understandable to us, and w...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1960 item #820664 (stock #10-58)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Long, low Burmese hermit figures with their distinctive hats and monk robes represent heroes from ancient Buddhist legends and folk stories. According to legend, the hermits spend most of their lives in self deprivation striving to perfect themselves morally, and if they achieve that perfection are reborn as zaw-gyi (zagwi), supernatural beings who fly through water, land and air doing good deeds. Some stories say zaw-gyi live forever, others say they live a mere 80,000 years. They are venerated...