Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Thai : Pre 2000 item #832718 (stock #57-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$275.00
This soaring form, called a gaelae (galae), is seen in Northern Thailand on the peaked rooftops of houses and other structures built by the Thai Lanna people. On old buildings gaelae are extensions of the ends of roof beams crossed to form a V-shape. On newer houses they usually are separate carvings such as this one and are attached to the peaks of the steep roofs after the basic structure is completed. As to their original use, the most commonly heard explanation is that they were meant to di...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1837 VR item #902690 (stock #38-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 18th century inkstone has a gourd-shaped ink pool cut into a deep black stone slab that, along with brushes, ink and paper, represented what was referred to in Chinese literature as “the four precious things of the library.” Among the four objects, inkstones were considered the most important, the soul of the scholar’s library, because they were said to represent “the infinite subtlety of nature.” Although they appear to be relatively humble objects, inkstones were praised, co...