Asian Antiques by Silk Road
Sort By:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles. The type and amount of carving and other decoration also varied but almost w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #882912 (stock #64-06)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
A large 19th century bronze bell from Burma has a tall holding ring with legendary figures from Burmese Buddhist iconography—kinnari, half man/half bird creatures, and manok-thi-ha, half man/half lion sphinx-like images. Two kinnari stand with their large wings spread upward to create the form of the tall spire. Two manok-thi-ha (also called manushi or manuthiha or a number of other names derived from the Sanskrit words “manu” for man and “simha” for lion) crouch with their backs suppo...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Thai : Pre 2000 item #832718 (stock #57-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$275.00
This soaring form, called a gaelae (galae), is seen in Northern Thailand on the peaked rooftops of houses and other structures built by the Thai Lanna people. On old buildings gaelae are extensions of the ends of roof beams crossed to form a V-shape. On newer houses they usually are separate carvings such as this one and are attached to the peaks of the steep roofs after the basic structure is completed. As to their original use, the most commonly heard explanation is that they were meant to di...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #914262 (stock #62-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$560.00
This Meiji era ranma, an interior transom, was an integral part of the architecture of an old Japanese frame house. Within those houses, moveable partitions of wide sliding doors (fusuma) were used to define rooms, allowing the flexible use of space. The ranma was suspended above the fusuma to fill a gap between the tops of the doors and the ceiling. Pierced carvings on these wood transoms facilitated circulation of air and light throughout the house as well as adding a decorative element. Carve...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #678034 (stock #63-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Seated in lotus position, this early 20th century bronze Burmese Buddha has classic Ava features. The right hand is in bhumisparsa mudra (earth touching, centering), the robe is quite simple, the face triangular with small upturned mouth and the head is topped with an onion-shaped finial--all Ava attributes. Unlike the more ornate double lotus throne seen on many Ava figures, however, this Buddha of later vintage sits on a plain waisted throne. The relatively small size and simplicity of the thr...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #853841 (stock #51-49)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Dated 1870 on the base, this late Qing Dynasty ceramic figure is of General Guan Gong, a popular character in Chinese opera, who is cast as brave, swashbuckling and, above all, fiercely loyal to the emperor. The piece is quite detailed, with decorative elements of the butterscotch and white costume defined in relief as well as with intricate incising. Within the general’s wide, open-mouthed grin, his tongue and seven teeth are clearly visible. His face and hands are unglazed. His headpiece sho...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Contemporary item #760551 (stock #24-06)
Silk Road Gallery
$120.00
A carved vase of hardwood native to Uzbekistan shows the strong relationship in aesthetics between Middle Eastern Persian or Iranian design and that of the Uzbeks of Central Asia. This piece is the product of an Uzbek family woodcarving business run by the family matriarch, herself a second generation woodcarver. Although the business mainly produces large ornately carved furniture for the local market in Uzbekistan, family members take great delight in creating small, carefully carved, time-con...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1970 item #895454 (stock #64-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
The Ramayana characters of Hamunan, the white monkey god, and Sita, the abducted wife of Rama, form the handle of this hand carved teak rice scoop from Burma. Hanuman is depicted carrying Sita back across the sea to Rama after rescuing her from the evil king Ravanna. The figures are familiar icons in the arts of Southeast Asia, particularly in Burma where the many heroes and villains of The Ramayana are universally recognized because the epic is still regularly performed there in puppet shows an...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long. Three lines of script etched into the lacquer around the base of...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina. (For a similar offering bowl see "Burmese Crafts Past and Present" by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994, color plate 45.) The ta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #936671 (stock #41-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,800.00
A dolomite plaque carved with the eight great scenes in the life of Buddha dates to the early 16th century during Burma’s Ava Period (1364 -1752 A.D). Plaques from as early as 700 A.D. depicting these eight events have been unearthed in Burma, and during the Pagan Period (1084-1287 A.D.) carved tablets representing the eight episodes became prevalent. This dolomite (limestone) piece has Pagan attributes such as the definition of the robe on the central Buddha but signals of its later Ava orig...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1970 item #698608 (stock #30-99)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
This triptych tableau featuring the Buddhist earth goddess, Wathundaye, is carved of teak and fitted with wood hinges to form a folding altar. The mid-20th century piece is from the countryside in Burma, where Wathundaye is a revered Buddhist icon. She is shown in the act of wringing water from her long hair, depicting a Jataka story that credits her with using the water to drown the evil Mara and his armies who were attempting to disrupt Buddha's path to enlightenment as he meditated under the ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1940 item #1236618 (stock #10-76)
Silk Road Gallery
$700.00
This sitting Mandalay Buddha is an outstanding example of the fine skill of Burmese artisans in using thayo. The opulent robe with intricate frills and edging, the figure's tightly curled hair and well defined lotus throne were created using thayo, a mixture of lacquer and bone ash that dries to the hardness of wood. The figure's erect posture adds to the sculpture's aura of settled elegance. Carving of on the hands and feet is carefully modeled and realistic. The unusual lightly brushed dull...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #136391 (stock #38-50)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,900.00
A finely done representation of Guanyin, Chinese goddess of mercy and compassion, this figure is carved of hwa yong, a slow-growing hardwood. The carving was coated first with red lacquer, which was then covered over in most areas with dark brown lacquer. The red color was retained to define the inner folds of the robe and to focus attention on the delicately carved hands and feet. Over time, the brown lacquer has worn thin in other areas allowing the red to show through and creating a pleasing ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #978464 (stock #31-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This bronze leogryph figure with human face is from early 20th century Burma and is a variation of the Buddhist temple guardian called manok-thi-ha or manushi, names derived from the Sanskrit words for man (manu) and lion (simha). Burmese manok-thi-ha often have double rear quarters (two bums—see our catalog item 63-37). This one is single-bummed and outfitted with heavy necklace, chest ornament and lots of swirls. The fantastic manok-thi-ha, a creature from Buddhist mythology, is said to roam...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1960 item #820664 (stock #10-58)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Long, low Burmese hermit figures with their distinctive hats and monk robes represent heroes from ancient Buddhist legends and folk stories. According to legend, the hermits spend most of their lives in self deprivation striving to perfect themselves morally, and if they achieve that perfection are reborn as zaw-gyi (zagwi), supernatural beings who fly through water, land and air doing good deeds. Some stories say zaw-gyi live forever, others say they live a mere 80,000 years. They are venerated...