Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #266405 (stock #57-62)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Elegantly executed designs in red, yellow and green on a black background decorate this 19th century Burmese lacquer box. Called a "bi-it," this beautifully crafted container held combs, oil, perfume and sandalwood powder. The unusual scene on the lid shows a man and woman walking among trees collecting fruit. Their multi-patterned traditional clothing is drawn in great detail. Graceful flowers, calligraphy with a wish for happiness, and the signature of the maker decorate the sides of the lid a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #312760 (stock #57-32)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
Variations in the shades of these green and white jade chess pieces give this set from Burma (Myanmar) extra appeal. Green knights are dark and opaque; other green pieces are translucent and various lighter shades. Many of the white pieces show a blush of pink. Burma is the source of much of the world's jade, which is found there in several colors. The board, set into the top of a carved teak wood storage/carrying case, also is made of green and white jade. Chess pieces are carved in the Western...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #875686 (stock #63-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$620.00
This early 20th century lacquer betel nut container has intricate incised scenes that recreate the magical interior of the old Burmese court. Dancers, mythical animals, courtiers, and servants surround the king on this throne in vignettes that cover the deep lid and base. The inscriptions "good health" and "be rich" are etched along the top edge of the deep lid. All the scenes are surrounded by fine bands of color and foliage with a cross-hatched background. Two trays that slide inside the high...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Contemporary item #1074923 (stock #19-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$230.00
Pair
The faces of comedy and tragedy are represented in this pair of masks carved of hibiscus wood by I. W. Mudano, a second generation master carver from Indonesia. Mr. Mudano, who has exhibited internationally for decades, works primarily in yellow hibiscus wood, and is recognized for his special talent in making delightful artistic use of the natural variations in the wood’s grain and shades. These masks were purchased more than 20 years ago from the carver in his studio in the small town of Mas...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #936671 (stock #41-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,800.00
A dolomite plaque carved with the eight great scenes in the life of Buddha dates to the early 16th century during Burma’s Ava Period (1364 -1752 A.D). Plaques from as early as 700 A.D. depicting these eight events have been unearthed in Burma, and during the Pagan Period (1084-1287 A.D.) carved tablets representing the eight episodes became prevalent. This dolomite (limestone) piece has Pagan attributes such as the definition of the robe on the central Buddha but signals of its later Ava orig...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied. Tin trays were replacing these handmade ones a number o...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #141341 (stock #40-05)
Silk Road Gallery
$550.00
Cast about 30 years ago, this replica bronze Buddha head is in the style of Thailand's Sukhothai Kingdom. The Sukhothai period, which lasted from the mid-13th century to the end of the 14th century, is often called "The Golden Age of Thai Civilization." Religious art and architecture from this period are regarded by many art historians as representing the most classic of Thai styles. The face of a Sukhothai Buddha is immediately recognizable for its regal, commanding look, with heavily lidded ey...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1345209 (stock #64-46)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Eight bronze weights, commonly known as opium weights, are cast in the image of a mythical wild goose. The bird, referred to as "hintha" in Burmese or as "hamsa" in Sanskrit, is regarded as a sacred icon and also is the symbol of Burma's Mon People. Weights in the forms of mythical birds and animals were used in Burma from the 18th century into the 20th century to weigh small household items purchased in the marketplaces. Over the years, they became known as "opium" weights, but according to S...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1940 item #924655 (stock #62-25)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
A tall carved teak Mandalay Buddha has an elegantly draped robe with a deep edging of thayo, a lacquering technique used for centuries by Burmese artisans to create the look and feel of intricate wood carving. The forehead band is also thayo, lacquer thickened with bone ash that dries to the hardness of wood. A thin brown/red lacquer applied over the carved teak allows the grain of the dense native wood to show. Traces of gold add richness to the figure and double lotus throne. The face is beau...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #815705 (stock #12-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A small lacquer box incised with the Burmese “yun” technique has an unusual lid design of a scarf encircled with foliage. Using the yun method, the pattern is accomplished by cutting through top layers of lacquer to reveal one or more differently colored lacquer layers underneath. In this case, just black and light red lacquers were used, producing a container with a simplicity that sets it apart from the multi-colored intricate yun work seen on the larger cylindrical betel boxes from Burma....
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1940 item #1344377 (stock #11-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
A Burmese Buddha revered for healing the spirit as well as the body holds a pot containing the water of long life. Ornamentation is especially dramatic, with a high spired crown and the lavish use of a Burmese lacquer process called thayo on the robes to represent elaborate embroidery. The cape is flared at the sides giving the figure a striking silhouette. Small applications of gold leaf added by the devout when a Buddha is displayed add interest to the dark brown teakwood carving. This mid-19...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #919136 (stock #63-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Two kneeling nats, possibly representing the Taungbyon brothers, among the most revered deities in the Burmese spirit world of nats, are carved with identical positions and thrones but faces that are quite different from one another. Widespread belief among the Burmese of nats, the spirits of certain departed humans, and also of nat spirits of trees, rivers, rocks and more, predates the introduction of Buddhism in Burma. Thirty-seven nats, both protectors and rogues, each with its own complex s...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #820399 (stock #06-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
Pair
Teak hangers for decorative textiles or drapes are carved with figures of Dewi Sri, Hindu goddess of agrarian fertility, a revered icon on the Indonesian island of Java. The painted faces are in the style of the old Majapahit Empire that flourished in East Java during the 13th to 15th centuries. These hangers are from the early 19th century. Throughout Java, Dewi Sri takes on a variety of appearances, sometimes dressed as royalty, sometimes in local costume, in wood, ceramic and bone figures, a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #876853 (stock #58-78)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century Chinese box made for storing small teacups, this piece is an example of an everyday utilitarian object with design and workmanship that stands the test of time. The box is constructed of shaped wood staves fitted together in barrel fashion and secured top and bottom with brass bands. The lid is in two parts, with the back half affixed and the front half removable so that the stacked cups were secure but easily taken out of the container. The box is lacquered in dark red and t...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1960 item #820664 (stock #10-58)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Long, low Burmese hermit figures with their distinctive hats and monk robes represent heroes from ancient Buddhist legends and folk stories. According to legend, the hermits spend most of their lives in self deprivation striving to perfect themselves morally, and if they achieve that perfection are reborn as zaw-gyi (zagwi), supernatural beings who fly through water, land and air doing good deeds. Some stories say zaw-gyi live forever, others say they live a mere 80,000 years. They are venerated...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1980 item #860292 (stock #31-27)
Silk Road Gallery
On Hold
A pair of pulleys that were used on a hand loom in Burma show the Burmese love for exuberant decorative elements on objects for everyday use. The tall carved peacocks are larger than the pulleys, and may have been just one of a number of such decorations on a woman’s loom. Simple household objects are traditionally well made and attractive in Burma, where no lines are drawn between fine arts and folk or applied arts. The peacock, emblem of the Kon-baung Dynasty (1752-1885), remains a favorite ...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1940 item #1236618 (stock #10-76)
Silk Road Gallery
$700.00
This sitting Mandalay Buddha is an outstanding example of the fine skill of Burmese artisans in using thayo. The opulent robe with intricate frills and edging, the figure's tightly curled hair and well defined lotus throne were created using thayo, a mixture of lacquer and bone ash that dries to the hardness of wood. The figure's erect posture adds to the sculpture's aura of settled elegance. Carving of on the hands and feet is carefully modeled and realistic. The unusual lightly brushed dull...