Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #799154 (stock #38-93)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
This early to mid-19th century Chinese pewter teapot is sized to brew two small cups of tea. The outsized handle, made to resemble a Western cup handle, and the long curved spout are said to be a favorite design of that era, probably because it was so functional. Pewter was used for brewing strong teas; ceramics for brewing lighter teas. This pot has a few small dents on one side of the shoulder; otherwise it is in good condition. Dimensions: height 7" (18 cm), width from handle to spout tip 6-1...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #815705 (stock #12-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A small lacquer box incised with the Burmese “yun” technique has an unusual lid design of a scarf encircled with foliage. Using the yun method, the pattern is accomplished by cutting through top layers of lacquer to reveal one or more differently colored lacquer layers underneath. In this case, just black and light red lacquers were used, producing a container with a simplicity that sets it apart from the multi-colored intricate yun work seen on the larger cylindrical betel boxes from Burma....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long. Three lines of script etched into the lacquer around the base of...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1950 item #933778 (stock #11-05)
Silk Road Gallery
$835.00
A royal Buddha, with right thumb and forefinger forming a circle, the vitarka mudra, sits in lotus position on a high double lotus throne. The vitarka gesture, sign of the Buddhist wheel of law, signifies intellectual discussion of philosophy and doctrine. This is one of several variations of the mudra, also conveyed with the circle sign given by the hand raised with palm outward, or the hand palm up resting in the lap. This figure, carved of dense Burmese teak wood, is attired in the distinc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1910 item #1126165 (stock #12-57)
Silk Road Gallery
$290.00
This late Qing scholar’s box has a removable dark red and gold carved front panel that secures four drawers behind it. The intended interpretation of the gilded garden scene carving is a mystery: A man and woman appear to be observing or celebrating an object, possibly a manuscript, tied with a rope into a bundle that is suspended above them from an overhanging flowering branch. It is interesting to speculate that perhaps the scholar just completed some important writing and this is a celebrat...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1900 item #257200 (stock #03-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
The naga, Southeast Asia's "dragon of the sea," is a favorite protector throughout the region. This one, of weathered teak wood, is from Thailand where naga often are seen in pairs at entrances to temple grounds and positioned at intervals along roof lines. They are there to ward off evil spirits and natural disaster just as the naga is said to have protected the Buddha from lightning as he meditated under a bo tree. This one still has traces of yellow paint, and most likely was studded with bri...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1980 item #1104319 (stock #11-17)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
The fretwork in this vintage Chinese architectural panel combines both rounded and straight-edged pieces of elm wood to create a simple, elegant pattern. Large openwork panels such as this were handcrafted by artisans into many hundreds of fretwork designs and set within a variety of square, rectangle, round, hexagon and octagon frames to be used as interior windows in old Chinese houses, providing light, air circulation and a feeling of space. We have seen them recycled for present day archite...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth. A pliable mixture ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #853841 (stock #51-49)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Dated 1870 on the base, this late Qing Dynasty ceramic figure is of General Guan Gong, a popular character in Chinese opera, who is cast as brave, swashbuckling and, above all, fiercely loyal to the emperor. The piece is quite detailed, with decorative elements of the butterscotch and white costume defined in relief as well as with intricate incising. Within the general’s wide, open-mouthed grin, his tongue and seven teeth are clearly visible. His face and hands are unglazed. His headpiece sho...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #951381 (stock #30-94)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A small bronze kyizi gong from a village in Burma is flanked by two coiled naga, sea dragons that are Buddhist icons of protection revered throughout Southeast Asia. Kyizi, (pronounced chi-z) are, as far as we know, unique to Burma, and cast in a variety of sizes, from smaller than this one to quite large, heavy pieces. Suspended on a rope, they are struck on the upturned ends so the gong swings in a circle and emits a vibrating tone, used to mark donations to the monastery or to alert local re...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Sri Lanka : Pre 1900 item #1021472 (stock #35-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$295.00
A dragon’s mouth holds the flame in this 19th century bronze oil lamp from Ceylon. The dragon head and lamp base, cast as a separate unit, screw off the top tiered part of the lamp, which is hollow to hold the oil (see photo enlargement #3). The oil flows down through the dragon head to feed a wick threaded into the mouth. A heavy chain cast in double links is attached to a loop at the top of the lamp, allowing it to be used either as a hanging or a standing piece (see photo enlargement #6). T...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Thai : Pre 2000 item #832718 (stock #57-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$275.00
This soaring form, called a gaelae (galae), is seen in Northern Thailand on the peaked rooftops of houses and other structures built by the Thai Lanna people. On old buildings gaelae are extensions of the ends of roof beams crossed to form a V-shape. On newer houses they usually are separate carvings such as this one and are attached to the peaks of the steep roofs after the basic structure is completed. As to their original use, the most commonly heard explanation is that they were meant to di...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #335268 (stock #57-18)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
The hin-tha, or sacred goose, an icon found in both the folk and Buddhist art of Southeast Asia, is the subject of this 19th century teak wood carving from Burma. The bird's head points skyward and it holds a small fish in its beak. A kneeling man rides in the curve of its long neck. Also called a hamsa, the hin-tha is among the many creatures that play roles in The Jataka, stories about the lives of The Buddha. It is found on sacred objects as well as everyday utilitarian items. This carving wa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #788418 (stock #64-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An elephant with raised trunk, symbol of hospitality, forms the handle of this carved teakwood Burmese rice scoop. The dark red lacquer, applied over black lacquer in the traditional manner of Burmese artisans, is worn so the black undercoat shows through in areas, giving this early 20th century piece an inviting patina. The elephant trunk, which forms the scoop handle, is especially worn and shows evidence of many years of use. A simple decorative pattern is carved along the top of the scoop, a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #922753 (stock #63-29)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Delicately incised yun designs on a three-piece lacquer betel box from the Burmese city of Pagan depict scenes of five elegantly dressed courtiers, each portrayed within a distinctive and elaborate portal. The name of the artisan, Ko Sein Maung, is incised in one ribbon-like cartouche, and his locale, Pagan Dikesu, in another. The wish, chantha basage (may you be rich), appears in a third cartouche. The container has three parts—a deep lid, a high base and a fitted tray. It is designed to reta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #878968 (stock #60-11)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This Taihu scholar's stone is classified as "linglong," one of the criteria used by connoisseurs to judge the rocks collected by Chinese literati. The term linglong may be translated as "shapely" or as "pierced with many holes." This stone also is in the category of "fantastic rock" (as opposed to "zoomorphic rocks" and "landscape rocks") for the obvious reason that one can see abstract, dream-like representations in its form. Shaped by the water of Tai Hu (Lake Tai) near Suzhou, its dark khaki...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied. Tin trays were replacing these handmade ones a number o...