Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1900 item #332092 (stock #56-19)
Silk Road Gallery
$295.00
Beautifully designed and constructed of curved wood staves with a wrapped bamboo handle, this lidded container was used to carry tools needed by lamp lighters on their rounds. Five bands of ornamental carving encircle the basket. The lid is centered with a round carving representing the four points of the compass, and the base is carved with a diaper pattern in key design. The carvings, though plentiful, are restrained in execution and serve to emphasize the wonderfully balanced shape of the con...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1900 item #877988 (stock #60-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
Vignettes from Chinese operas are painted on this octagonal late Qing wood trunk. Rendered primarily in orange/red, cream and black, and framed in red and blue, the scenes float on a striking turquoise background. On one side of the piece, a large dramatic orange/red flower painting gives variety to the colorful vignettes. The trunk, or lidded box, may have been used to store costumes for a traveling opera company. Or, it may have been used in a Chinese opera-loving household. It has metal carry...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #800706 (stock #58-47)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
Among the many varieties of red lacquered containers used during China's Qing and early Republic years, none has a more striking form than the humble lunch pail. An elegantly designed everyday item, it is constructed of shaped wood staves, a tall bent willow handle and a notched lid that snaps securely in place around the handle. Pails in this design also are referred to as berry pails. The recessed bottom on this one is decorated with two drawings of flowers, perhaps done by the maker of the pa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1910 item #884476 (stock #60-24)
Silk Road Gallery
$280.00
This late Qing wood pitcher from Shanghai is similar in form to provincial pitchers but is made of a harder wood, is more carefully constructed and has a sleeker look than its country cousins. The basic construction design is similar—shaped staves form the bowl and are held together with bands. The individual staves on this one are so tightly fitted that it looks as though it is carved from one piece of wood. The band around the bottom is metal but has been colored to match the wood; the uppe...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina. (For a similar offering bowl see "Burmese Crafts Past and Present" by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994, color plate 45.) The ta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #680180 (stock #60-90)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
Made of beautifully grained willow wood, this early 20th century Chinese water carrier is just the right size and shape to hold magazines or newspapers. The tall handle is centered with a well done carving of a tree branch and two pomegranates, a traditional symbol of fertility in old China. The oval-shaped body of the vessel is made of curved willow wood staves fitted tightly together and held with two brass bands. Although the piece seems too handsome for its intended use as a water pail, the ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #834732 (stock #10-62)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A fine, tight weave of thin reeds gives texture to the cinnabar and black lacquer finish of this mid-19th century Burmese bowl. The textural quality is heightened by the wearing of top layers of cinnabar lacquer revealing black lacquer underneath for a handsome negoro effect. Resting on four low feet, the bowl, or “kwet,” flares out to a wide point about three-quarters up its height, and then gently angles in toward its crisp upper edge. The inner surface is smoothed with many coats of la...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #922753 (stock #63-29)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Delicately incised yun designs on a three-piece lacquer betel box from the Burmese city of Pagan depict scenes of five elegantly dressed courtiers, each portrayed within a distinctive and elaborate portal. The name of the artisan, Ko Sein Maung, is incised in one ribbon-like cartouche, and his locale, Pagan Dikesu, in another. The wish, chantha basage (may you be rich), appears in a third cartouche. The container has three parts—a deep lid, a high base and a fitted tray. It is designed to reta...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1089599 (stock #11-21)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A Qing Dynasty lidded wooden box designed to serve pancakes combines handsome form with evidence of long use to evoke hundreds of banquets in late 18th/early 19th century China. The top of the notched lid is centered with a green and gold painting of chrysanthemums, symbol of conviviality. Faded calligraphy can still be seen on the underside of the lid. The bottom surface of the container also has very faint remains of calligraphy. Two deeply worn areas along the top surface of the tall hand-h...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Thai : Pre 1990 item #937270 (stock #01-81)
Silk Road Gallery
$135.00
A charming hand woven and decorated basket of split bamboo made in an Isan village in Northeastern Thailand is smoothed on the exterior with an application of brick red lacquer thickened with ash. Yellow and green flowers and dots on black grounds give the basket folk appeal. The Isan (also Isaan) people, though sometimes called Thai Isan, are a blend of Lao, Mon and and Khmer, and have their own language, which is Lao-like but written in the Thai alphabet. They are primarily agrarian and live i...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #266405 (stock #57-62)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Elegantly executed designs in red, yellow and green on a black background decorate this 19th century Burmese lacquer box. Called a "bi-it," this beautifully crafted container held combs, oil, perfume and sandalwood powder. The unusual scene on the lid shows a man and woman walking among trees collecting fruit. Their multi-patterned traditional clothing is drawn in great detail. Graceful flowers, calligraphy with a wish for happiness, and the signature of the maker decorate the sides of the lid a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to deci...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1244658 (stock #39-32)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
From late 19th century Burma, this parabaik, or book, is made of thick cardboard-like paper folded accordion-style with front and back covers of gilded relief lacquer. The paper was made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree that was boiled for a day until soft, then pounded and spread on fabric that was stretched across a frame. The frame was repeatedly dipped in water and drained, then dried in the sun, spread with glue and chalk powder, and finally, polished with seeds. The thick paper ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1111838 (stock #12-72)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This handsome bamboo basket from early 20th century China is a fine example of the care that was lavished on the creation of everyday utilitarian items by Chinese artisans. Delightful woven designs on the handle, knob and basket edges are emphasized in red, and a pattern of painted black designs encircles the lid. The bottom of the basket is recessed and rests atop a red and black bamboo base. The basket is strong, light, comfortable to carry and attractive. It is in excellent condition. Dime...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #898500 (stock #63-30)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century lacquer betel box from Burma is incised in an intricate pattern called “yok-thei,” with tiny dancers swirling through vegetal scrolling. The small design, primarily red and green, is punctuated with black and green circles that look like launching pads for the flying stylized dancers. (For a betel box with a similar yok-thei pattern, see color plate # 41 in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994.) This is one of the more...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #811124 (stock #64-05)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
The monks Sariputta and Mogallana have been honored in Burmese Buddhist art as the two chief disciples of Buddha for more than 800 years, as evidenced by their images on 12th century plaques excavated at Pagan. Until the late 18th century they were most often integrated into carvings and bronzes of the Buddha. After artisans started carving and casting each of the figures separately, the pose of each monk evolved into the traditional poses seen on these black lacquered carvings, and now vary mai...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #815705 (stock #12-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
A small lacquer box incised with the Burmese “yun” technique has an unusual lid design of a scarf encircled with foliage. Using the yun method, the pattern is accomplished by cutting through top layers of lacquer to reveal one or more differently colored lacquer layers underneath. In this case, just black and light red lacquers were used, producing a container with a simplicity that sets it apart from the multi-colored intricate yun work seen on the larger cylindrical betel boxes from Burma....