Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #291633 (stock #60-22)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
Elegant wood boxes with drawers and compartments were regarded by Chinese scholars as essential for the storage of the small personal items they valued. Their carved signature seals and ink sticks often were stored in these boxes, which usually were kept on a desk in the scholar's study but were small enough to be moved easily into the courtyard when he preferred to work outside. This late 19th century box has three drawers and a compartment with two doors made of nicely beaded panels. Door pane...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1089599 (stock #11-21)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A Qing Dynasty lidded wooden box designed to serve pancakes combines handsome form with evidence of long use to evoke hundreds of banquets in late 18th/early 19th century China. The top of the notched lid is centered with a green and gold painting of chrysanthemums, symbol of conviviality. Faded calligraphy can still be seen on the underside of the lid. The bottom surface of the container also has very faint remains of calligraphy. Two deeply worn areas along the top surface of the tall hand-h...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1837 VR item #894121 (stock #07-61)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
A merchant’s money box, or zeni-bako, from Japan’s Edo Period carries an inscription that reads, “Purchased one lucky day in November in the 12th year of Bunsei,” which was 1829. The small copper coins in use at that time were called “zeni” and led to the development of simple, strong boxes for merchants to store coins during the business day. This box is made of thick keyaki wood and fitted with an iron lock and hasp. The top is constructed in two sections with a hole in the middle ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #876853 (stock #58-78)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century Chinese box made for storing small teacups, this piece is an example of an everyday utilitarian object with design and workmanship that stands the test of time. The box is constructed of shaped wood staves fitted together in barrel fashion and secured top and bottom with brass bands. The lid is in two parts, with the back half affixed and the front half removable so that the stacked cups were secure but easily taken out of the container. The box is lacquered in dark red and t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #788418 (stock #64-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An elephant with raised trunk, symbol of hospitality, forms the handle of this carved teakwood Burmese rice scoop. The dark red lacquer, applied over black lacquer in the traditional manner of Burmese artisans, is worn so the black undercoat shows through in areas, giving this early 20th century piece an inviting patina. The elephant trunk, which forms the scoop handle, is especially worn and shows evidence of many years of use. A simple decorative pattern is carved along the top of the scoop, a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1900 item #877988 (stock #60-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
Vignettes from Chinese operas are painted on this octagonal late Qing wood trunk. Rendered primarily in orange/red, cream and black, and framed in red and blue, the scenes float on a striking turquoise background. On one side of the piece, a large dramatic orange/red flower painting gives variety to the colorful vignettes. The trunk, or lidded box, may have been used to store costumes for a traveling opera company. Or, it may have been used in a Chinese opera-loving household. It has metal carry...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #891192 (stock #64-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This late 19th century offering vessel from the Burmese city of Pagan is an exceptionally fine example of the hsun-ok containers used to carry food offerings to Buddhist monasteries and temples. It is made of wood covered with many coats of lacquer, black first and then top layers of rich deep red. As the red lacquer wears away in areas exposing the black, a handsome negoro effect is created. A similar wooden hsun-ok is pictured in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxfo...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1245419 (stock #60-25)
Silk Road Gallery
$260.00
This late Qing Dynasty teacup box has a high handle carved with the figure of a deer, an auspicious Chinese symbol used to wish longevity. Foliage, flowers and scalloping also are carved on both sides of the handle as well as on the ear-like curved ends that hold the handle in place. The rich red lacquer on the wooden box contrasts nicely with touches of deep, dark green and faint gilding. The container is fitted with a removable half-lid that allowed stacks of traditional Chinese teacups witho...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles. The type and amount of carving and other decoration also varied but almost w...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #680180 (stock #60-90)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
Made of beautifully grained willow wood, this early 20th century Chinese water carrier is just the right size and shape to hold magazines or newspapers. The tall handle is centered with a well done carving of a tree branch and two pomegranates, a traditional symbol of fertility in old China. The oval-shaped body of the vessel is made of curved willow wood staves fitted tightly together and held with two brass bands. Although the piece seems too handsome for its intended use as a water pail, the ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1910 item #884476 (stock #60-24)
Silk Road Gallery
$280.00
This late Qing wood pitcher from Shanghai is similar in form to provincial pitchers but is made of a harder wood, is more carefully constructed and has a sleeker look than its country cousins. The basic construction design is similar—shaped staves form the bowl and are held together with bands. The individual staves on this one are so tightly fitted that it looks as though it is carved from one piece of wood. The band around the bottom is metal but has been colored to match the wood; the uppe...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising. Lines were incised through the top coats of black lacquer to reveal the persimmon-colored lacquer underne...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1910 item #1237426 (stock #11-19)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Remarkable carving skill makes this late 19th/early 20th century container a handsome relic of the days when time and care were given to making utilitarian objects for Chinese households. The pleasingly clean form is created by the curved handle and spout, each carved seamlessly as part of staves that are integrated with 13 additional staves to form the container. A symbol carefully carved and gilded on the handle most likely had a significant meaning for the family. This piece, from Zheijian...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1233407 (stock #12-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
From China’s Shaanxi Province, known for its many types of marvelous dumplings, this late Qing woven reed basket opens clamshell fashion to form two large serving bowls. Wide bent willow bands painted with flowers and secured to the basketry with metal studs encircle the top and bottom sections. A metal hasp in the front is used to keep the top and bottom closed, and a metal ring in the back is used to keep the two sections attached when they are used as bowls. This piece shows appropriate ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #854196 (stock #10-68)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
This large lacquered early 20th century bowl from the Shan people, who live primarily in eastern parts of Burma and across the border in western and northern areas of Thailand, is called a “kwet” and was used to serve huge quantities of rice. It is made of split bamboo basketry supported by six sturdy ribs that curve down to end in six low feet. The basic bamboo construction is coated inside and out with layers of black lacquer overlaid with layers of red lacquer. The basketry shows through ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1244658 (stock #39-32)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
From late 19th century Burma, this parabaik, or book, is made of thick cardboard-like paper folded accordion-style with front and back covers of gilded relief lacquer. The paper was made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree that was boiled for a day until soft, then pounded and spread on fabric that was stretched across a frame. The frame was repeatedly dipped in water and drained, then dried in the sun, spread with glue and chalk powder, and finally, polished with seeds. The thick paper ...