Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1837 VR item #784126 (stock #33-54)
Silk Road Gallery
$375.00
An 18th century Chinese oil pitcher has a thick glaze decorated with blue calligraphy done in the loose, free "wet brush" manner. Collected for its spontaneity of design, Swatow ware with this type of calligraphy was made in South China and exported from the port of Swatow to countries throughout Southeast Asia. The cursive characters were applied with a very wet brush, depositing heavier, darker color at the ends of the strokes...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #896352 (stock #63-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
An offering stand, or “kalat,” used by the Intha people who live in the villages around Inle Lake in one of the Shan states in northeastern Burma, is from the late 19th century. A similar though more recent piece in the British Museum is pictured in “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer,” by Isaacs and Blurton, British Museum Press, p. 163...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #142931 (stock #39-02)
Silk Road Gallery
$2,900.00
Nearly four feet in height, this 19th century Burmese Mandalay Buddha holds the right hand in the varada gesture to signify fulfillment of all wishes, boon granting and charity. A small fruit offering also is held in the right hand. This graceful classic figure is carved from dense Burmese teak and stands on a lotus throne. An undercoating of dark red lacquer that shows through worn areas in the gilding gives the piece an attractive patina...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #136391 (stock #38-50)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,900.00
A finely done representation of Guanyin, Chinese goddess of mercy and compassion, this figure is carved of hwa yong, a slow-growing hardwood. The carving was coated first with red lacquer, which was then covered over in most areas with dark brown lacquer. The red color was retained to define the inner folds of the robe and to focus attention on the delicately carved hands and feet...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1111838 (stock #12-72)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This handsome bamboo basket from early 20th century China is a fine example of the care that was lavished on the creation of everyday utilitarian items by Chinese artisans. Delightful woven designs on the handle, knob and basket edges are emphasized in red, and a pattern of painted black designs encircles the lid. The bottom of the basket is recessed and rests atop a red and black bamboo base. The basket is strong, light, comfortable to carry and attractive. It is in excellent condition...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #943598 (stock #57-44)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This fantastic composite creature, a “tadiya yupa,” with features of a lion, goat, bird and serpent, once stood as a good omen in a Buddhist temple in Burma. Often referred to as brave lions, such friendly/fierce chimera figures are much loved in Burma, appearing in temple art and on personal items such as medicine and betel boxes. They are regarded both as protectors and as dispensers of good fortune. This one is particularly impressive because of its size and detailing...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1920 item #278822 (stock #60-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
As a nation of tea drinkers, the Chinese have lavished care on the artistry of implements associated with tea. This handsome wood box originated in Shaoxing, near Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, and was used for storing small, handle-less teacups. Wood boxes for this purpose were made throughout China in a variety of shapes, some with large, fold-down handles such as this one, some with fixed handles, some with no handles...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #886035 (stock #11-15)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 20th century Buddha from a Shan village in Burma wears an outer robe that flares wide at either side framing a lavishly adorned robe pulled tightly across the legs in a form fitting look originally associated with Pagan figures. The Buddha has the right hand turned palm out in varada mudra, a gesture of wish fulfillment and charity. Carved of teak wood, it is coated with dark red lacquer touched with gilding...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #511168 (stock #52-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This very large, striking 19th century Chinese embroidered silk collar was made to be worn over a silk robe on festive occasions. The collar was created from 40 separate petal-shaped pieces of black silk fanned around a lined neck band. Outer petals are embroidered with 20 different colorful butterflies; inner petals have 20 different vases holding a variety of flowers. Backed with white silk and set within a traditional Asian frame, this costume piece from China's past is now dramatic wall art...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #1250809 (stock #06-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
pair
These teak hangers are from Solo on the Indonesian island of Java and date to the early 19th century. Painted carvings of Hanuman, the heroic white monkey from the Southeast Asian epic, “The Ramayana,” sit atop long curved tails that form textile hangers. Fabrics can be draped so the Hanuman figures face front or to the sides. The hangers have holes at the top end so they can be either suspended or affixed directly to a wall...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1239618 (stock #63-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
This cinnabar-colored four-piece lacquer box from late 19th century Burma has intricate designs incised in fine black lines on its hatbox-style lid, high-sided container and two trays. The tortoise shell design is interspersed with small circles, and the lid top is centered with a gold-accented drawing of a character in native dress...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1910 item #786538 (stock #10-40)
Silk Road Gallery
$790.00
This bronze Buddha, with attributes true to Burma's late Ava period of the 1600s, was cast a few hundred years later in the late 19th/early 20th century. It was common practice for Burmese artisans of later periods to copy styles that originated much earlier, sometimes mixing attributes from several periods and regions. In this beautifully cast handsome Buddha, the form follows the Ava look in all respects. The wide forehead, lowered eyes, well-defined nose and small, slightly upturned lips comb...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #154386 (stock #08-07)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
In Burma's remote villages, Buddha images displayed in temples and homes sometimes were the work of local artisans. The figures, created with great reverence, are humble and often quite appealing. This charming 18th century folk Buddha is from the Shan people, one of the numerous ethnic groups that make up Burma's devoutly Buddhist population. The image, carved from teak wood, was coated with several layers of black lacquer and then gilded, typical for Burmese carved wood figures. As a final ste...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #894706 (stock #63-51)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
These lacquered wood figures of Buddha and five monks are from Burma, where they are displayed to commemorate Dhama Sakya, or First Sermon Day, in honor of what is believed to have been the Buddha’s initial teaching following enlightenment. The important event is celebrated annually on the fourth day of the sixth month of the Buddhist calendar, which falls sometime in June or July. In the tableau, the Buddha, after just achieving enlightenment, meets five ascetics at the town of Saranath, nea...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #888007 (stock #02-65)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A two-part silver box in the traditional Khmer motif of a singha, a mythical lion, is covered with swirling lines simulating fur, and has a fat pouf of a tail swung up over its broad back. Though it has the open jaw and flattened ears of a protector, its aura is more friendly than fierce. With a weight of 538 grams, this box is relatively large compared with other such boxes in the genre of handmade Khmer silver pieces found in the shapes of myriad birds and animals. (See the article “Khmer Si...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #784578 (stock #04-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
The gorgeous padded silk on this late 19th century Japanese obi has the softness and subtle sheen found only on fine old obi. Unlike the stiff lining usually found on the maru style, a pliable padding was used on this one, which makes it smooth and inviting to the touch. The silver and apricot flowers gleam on a warm brown background. As a maru obi, the patterned silk covers both sides of the 12-3/4 foot length. The piece is in excellent condition throughout. Measurements: length 152" (381 cm), ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #877269 (stock #22-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
A very large silk yonhwado painting by Korean painter Hang San is a serene and soft scene of three waterfowl nestled among large lotus leaves. Traditional Korean lotus paintings, called yonhwado, were displayed in Korean homes during summer months on the open wood verandah or on the walls of the gentlemen's quarters. This late Choson early 20th century painting owes its calm to the placement and muted tones of the green leaves and a few rings of blue water on the fine silk. The scene includes th...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #168849 (stock #08-45)
Silk Road Gallery
$650.00
Sliding reed doors such as these late Meiji Period fusuma were used in Japan during the hot summer months to replace shoji screens and solid doors. The reeds allowed cooling breezes to circulate yet afforded privacy. On these doors, the reeds are carefully arranged so the darker areas form a wave pattern. They are held in place by horizontal strips of bamboo on one side and kiri wood on the other. The frame and top portion of the doors are made of light-weight kiri wood. Doors play an important ...