Asian Antiques by Silk Road
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #896352 (stock #63-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
An offering stand, or “kalat,” used by the Intha people who live in the villages around Inle Lake in one of the Shan states in northeastern Burma, is from the late 19th century. A similar though more recent piece in the British Museum is pictured in “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer,” by Isaacs and Blurton, British Museum Press, p. 163. Kalat stands such as this were used by families in much the same manner as the tall, spired hsun-ok to carry offerings of food ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #919136 (stock #63-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Two kneeling nats, possibly representing the Taungbyon brothers, among the most revered deities in the Burmese spirit world of nats, are carved with identical positions and thrones but faces that are quite different from one another. Widespread belief among the Burmese of nats, the spirits of certain departed humans, and also of nat spirits of trees, rivers, rocks and more, predates the introduction of Buddhism in Burma. Thirty-seven nats, both protectors and rogues, each with its own complex s...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #875350 (stock #62-53)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An early 20th century Chinese offering basket is affixed to a bamboo pedestal encircled with ink sketches of flowers representing the four seasons. The inside bottom of the tray is centered with a sauvastika, a Buddhist icon resembling a swastika but with the crampons turned to the left. Though the ancient Sanskrit symbol may have come to China as an auspicious Buddhist sign, it since has become a largely ornamental symbol of good fortune and can be seen in carpets, embroidery and carvings. In T...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #811124 (stock #64-05)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
The monks Sariputta and Mogallana have been honored in Burmese Buddhist art as the two chief disciples of Buddha for more than 800 years, as evidenced by their images on 12th century plaques excavated at Pagan. Until the late 18th century they were most often integrated into carvings and bronzes of the Buddha. After artisans started carving and casting each of the figures separately, the pose of each monk evolved into the traditional poses seen on these black lacquered carvings, and now vary mai...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1245419 (stock #60-25)
Silk Road Gallery
$260.00
This late Qing Dynasty teacup box has a high handle carved with the figure of a deer, an auspicious Chinese symbol used to wish longevity. Foliage, flowers and scalloping also are carved on both sides of the handle as well as on the ear-like curved ends that hold the handle in place. The rich red lacquer on the wooden box contrasts nicely with touches of deep, dark green and faint gilding. The container is fitted with a removable half-lid that allowed stacks of traditional Chinese teacups witho...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #800706 (stock #58-47)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
Among the many varieties of red lacquered containers used during China's Qing and early Republic years, none has a more striking form than the humble lunch pail. An elegantly designed everyday item, it is constructed of shaped wood staves, a tall bent willow handle and a notched lid that snaps securely in place around the handle. Pails in this design also are referred to as berry pails. The recessed bottom on this one is decorated with two drawings of flowers, perhaps done by the maker of the pa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #261283 (stock #57-66)
Silk Road Gallery
$175.00
The lid of this 19th century Burmese lacquer traveler's box is incised with a charming scene of two figures, separated by a tree, each of them with one hand raised in a farewell wave. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base constructed of fine strips of coiled bamboo, Burmese lacquerware is light and durable. The design on this box is hand drawn using a method called yun-incising. Lines were incised through the top coats of black lacquer to reveal the persimmon-colored lacquer underne...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied. Tin trays were replacing these handmade ones a number o...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1900 item #847598 (stock #60-21)
Silk Road Gallery
$470.00
This Qing Dynasty scholar’s box has four rosewood doors hand painted with ivory-colored flowers and foliage, following the traditional practice of Chinese scholars to surround themselves in their studios with reminders of nature. Made to be displayed on a table or desk, the box was used to store carved signature seals, ink sticks and other small items. The rosewood door panels are set within hand carved elm beading and frames, and the front, sides and top of the piece are made of elm wood in a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #268585 (stock #57-71)
Silk Road Gallery
$365.00
With its lovely chu-pan foliage design, this 19th century cosmetic (bi-it) box shows the Burmese skill at fine lacquer work. The maker's name is prominently displayed on the lid in a banner carried aloft by a lively nat (spirit). Called a bi-it, the container was used to hold sandalwood powder, which was mixed with water to form a paste applied by Burmese women to their face as a skin refiner and sunscreen. Made by layering many coats of lacquer over a base of thin wood and coiled bamboo strips,...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #949627 (stock #04-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$325.00
A large wood rice measure from early 20th century Korea, made in a uniquely Korean shape, adapts nicely to a second life as a plant holder. We have also seen these sturdy containers turned over and used as a stool or small table. Originally used to measure rice, it is made of thick planks of zelkova (keyaki) wood fitted together and held in place with black metal bands. The ear-like handles and heavy bottom obviously are hand-hewn. Hangul characters carved into the side indicate the measurement ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Furniture : Pre 1900 item #275941 (stock #56-16)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
A small fish is carved into the handle of this late 19th century Chinese water pail. Its two-piece lid and festive red color indicate it most likely was used in the house to store drinking water rather than to carry water from a well or stream. A character written on the bottom of the base may indicate the identity of the artisan. The body of the wood pail is constructed of staves fitted into an oval shape in barrel fashion and held together with twisted brass wire. Remove one or both sides of t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1837 VR item #262688 (stock #57-54)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
The deep, close-fitting lid, two interior trays and small size of this luminous cinnabar-colored box suggest that it was used to carry a personal supply of ingredients for assembling a quid of betel. Betel leaves would have been stored in the bottom, and areca nuts, lime and spices carried on the trays. The container dates from the early 19th century. A subtle tortoise shell design covers the top and side of the lid. The side and bottom of the box are decorated with narrow bands of incised lines...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1244658 (stock #39-32)
Silk Road Gallery
$395.00
From late 19th century Burma, this parabaik, or book, is made of thick cardboard-like paper folded accordion-style with front and back covers of gilded relief lacquer. The paper was made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree that was boiled for a day until soft, then pounded and spread on fabric that was stretched across a frame. The frame was repeatedly dipped in water and drained, then dried in the sun, spread with glue and chalk powder, and finally, polished with seeds. The thick paper ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #922753 (stock #63-29)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
Delicately incised yun designs on a three-piece lacquer betel box from the Burmese city of Pagan depict scenes of five elegantly dressed courtiers, each portrayed within a distinctive and elaborate portal. The name of the artisan, Ko Sein Maung, is incised in one ribbon-like cartouche, and his locale, Pagan Dikesu, in another. The wish, chantha basage (may you be rich), appears in a third cartouche. The container has three parts—a deep lid, a high base and a fitted tray. It is designed to reta...
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Cultural : Contemporary item #1235821 (stock #14-70)
Silk Road Gallery
$275.00
A teakwood jewelry box with deep carvings of lotus flowers, dragons and a peacock recalls Nepal’s old city of Bhaktapur, where streets are lined with lavishly carved windows and courtyards and above it all are the snow-covered peaks of the Himalayas as a backdrop. This piece has 14 “secret” compartments hidden in the top, middle and lower levels inside the box (see photo enlargements #4, 5 and 6). The lid slides off to reveal the top six compartments, which in turn slide to allow access t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1900 item #899863 (stock #60-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$495.00
This 19th century Chinese scholar's box has delicate bone inlay in a pattern of butterflies and flowers that swirl upward within four rosewood panels. A narrow rectangle of inlaid bone encloses each pattern. The panels are set within two doors on the front of the piece that swing out to reveal three drawers on one side and a large open compartment on the other. A “secret” storage area is accessible when the bottom drawer is removed. As is typical for Chinese joinery of the Qing Period, the d...